Executive Orders Relating to Indian Reserves

EXECUTIVE ORDERS

RELATING TO

INDIAN RESERVES,

FROM MAY 14, 1855, TO JULY 1, 1902

COMPILED BY THE INDIAN OFFICE UNDER AUTHORITY OF ACT OF CONGRESS

APPROVED MAY 17, 1882 (22 STATS., r 88,)

 

WASHINGTON:

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

1902

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,
Washington D.C., November 12, 1855

    SIR: I have the honor to submit herewith the report from the Commissioner of Indian Affairs of the 10th instant, and its accompanying papers, having relation to two of the reservations in California for Indian purposes, authorized by the act of 3d March Last.

   The precise limits of but one of the reservations, viz, a strip of territory commencing at the Pacific Ocean and extending 1 mile in width on each side of the Klamath River, are given, no sufficient data being furnished to justify any definite action on the other.

   I recommend your approval of the proposed Klamath [River] Reservation, with the provision, however, that upon survey of the tract a sufficient quantity be cut off from the upper end thereof to bring it within the limit of 25,000 acres authorized by law.

     Respectfully, your obedient servant,                                 R. McClelland, Secretary.

The President.

Let the reservation be made, as proposed.

Franklin Pierce.
November 16, 1855

  

MENDOCINO RESERVE

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, OFFICE OF INDIAN AGFFAIRS

April 16, 1856

    SIR: Referring to the report I had the honor to submit for your consideration on the 10th of November last relative to the establishment of a military reservation for the benefit of the Indians of northern California, upon both sides of the Klamath River, from it’s mouth the distance of 20 miles up the same; and to the remarks then made upon the subject of establishing a third similar reservation as proposed by the superintendent of Indian affairs in California, at Cape Mendocino, or at some point between that place and Russian River, or, as appeared to this office at that time more expedient, farther in the interior and easterly part of the State, I have now respectfully to call your attention again to the subject, and to submit for your consideration the following documents:

   From these documents it appears that the section between the Noyo River on the south and Bee-da-loe or Hale Creek on the north, extending from the coast on the west to the Coast Mountains, combines advantages which are not to be found in any of the other locations examined, reference being had to the purposes for which it is required and to the habits and necessities of the Indians.

   The tract intended for the reservation lies between the south bank of the Noyo River, so as to include that river, and a point 1 mile north of the mouth of the Hale or Bee-da-loe Creek, extending eastward from the coast for quantity so as to include the valleys beyond the first range of hills to the Coast Mountains, conforming to their shape. Its geographical position is in Mendocino County, about 170 miles from San Francisco, and 80 miles south of Cape Mendocino, 70 miles northwest of Clear Lake, and about 180 miles from Sacramento City.

   It is proposed to embrace within the limits of the reservation 25,000 acres of land.